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Developer Mehrdad Moayedi buys land for homes at Rowlett’s Bayside project

A North Texas developer known for some of the region’s biggest projects has bought sections of the Bayside development on Lake Ray Hubbard.

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Mehrdad Moayedi’s Centurion American Development Group purchased land in the Rowlett project on Interstate-30 for two residential projects.

In the works for more than five years, the 262-acre mixed-use development on the lake was originally planned to include everything from high-rise hotels to apartments and single-family homes.

The centerpiece of the $1 billion project was an 8-acore Crystal Lagoon waterpark to be built on the shore of Lake Ray Hubbard.

But after changes in ownership, Bayside has so far not met those ambitious plans. Parts of the project have been rechristened Sapphire Bay by the City of Rowlett.

Centurion American Development has purchased four acres in two tracts across the freeway from where the Crystal Lagoon is being built.

“This is on the north side of I-30 where all the apartment building has been,” Moayedi said. “There were two tracts left with the old partnership.

“They had quite a few offers and chose to go with us.”

Centurion American will use the property to build communities for more than 300 homes, townhouses and villas.

“It’s a great market for single-family residential and townhomes,” Moayedi said. “It came with three lots sitting on the lake.”

The more than 100 planned houses in the project will average around $400,000. And Moaeydi said the almost townhouses would cost between $275,000 and $400,000.

The land for the townhomes and villas must be rezoned from multifamily construction, he said.

Developer Western Rim Properties has already built apartments at Bayside in the same area where Centurion American purchased the land.

And Beazer Homes has a neighborhood in that section of the Bayside project.

“On the tract that’s already zoned, we are

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Davis Love III drops by to see ongoing Belmont Golf Course renovation project | Golf

The renovation will also include a putting course just under an acre in size, a driving range and a putting green.

After Belmont was opened in 1916, it was renovated by Donald Ross in 1927.

But the current renovation is restoring portions of the course back to the way it first was. Nine of the 12 holes on the main course will have original greens.

Other holes, on the six-hole short course, draw influences from other Tillinghast courses, like San Francisco Golf Club.

“It’s just, trying to bring the history back,” Love said.

Belmont isn’t short on history, as the only course in Virginia to host a PGA major: the 1949 PGA Championship, won by Sam Snead. Ben Hogan also won the Richmond Invitational there, four years earlier.

But space was one of the reasons First Tee and Love Golf Design opted to split the course into a 12-hole circuit and a six-hole short course, instead of leaving it at 18 holes. The facility lacked amenities like an area to practice, which First Tee needs for its youth programs.

So the spot was divided a bit.

“This was an 18-hole golf course with no practice facility,” said Brent Schneider, CEO of The First Tee of Greater Richmond. “And so we knew in its original state it wasn’t going to work. But we also really appreciated the history.”

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Curb appeal is an important home-improvement project

LAURINBURG — While the coronavirus pandemic has kept folks at home and sparked a number of home improvement projects, many of those have been inside the home.

But Adam Wilhelm, owner of AJW Landscaping of Laurinburg, says it’s the perfect time of year for some outdoor projects.

“The fall is a great time for doing some easy home improvement projects in the yard,” he said. “If the long, hot summer has stressed out your lawn, overseeding in the month of October with annual rye grass will give you a lush green stand of grass without breaking the bank.

“This is also a great time to plant shrubs and trees, with cooler temperatures allowing them to become established without the threat of extreme heat,” he added. “Once we’ve had our first frost it’s the right time to do some much-needed pruning and shaping of your already established shrubs and trees.”

Overall, Wilhelm thinks homeowners will often overlook the curb appeal of their property when thinking about home improvement projects.

With a background is real estate, Wilhelm said it can’t be overstated how important the concept of curb appeal is when it comes to buying or selling real property.

“Landscaping isn’t simply mowing and weed-eating,” he explained. “There are, in fact, a lot of lawn care companies that offer limited services, oftentimes mowing and trimming. Our business has evolved over the past few years to become more project-oriented. With so many maintenance-centered landscapers available, we’ve willingly taken on some of the other facets of landscaping and created a niche.”

Some examples of creating positive curb appeal include making sure shrubs and trees are pruned and manicured, pressure washing or cleaning the structure along with the walkways and driveways, adding color to the entrance either by painting or planters.

“Making sure your property

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See the results of a $4.5M renovation project at Plano’s Carpenter Park Athletic Complex

A $4.5 million renovation project installing four new artificial turf playing fields at the Carpenter Park Athletic Complex in Plano is now complete. The fields can host games and practices for sports including football, soccer, lacrosse and rugby, among other activities.

The project was funded through a $15.5 million bond referendum approved by voters in 2017.

Strong interest and wear and tear on the fields led to the renovation project at Carpenter Park, according to a video report produced by the city.

“Over the years, it’s gone from a two-season to basically almost a year-round season…And you just can’t play on a natural turf that much without just wearing it to the nub and worse,” Kevin Murray, assistant parks superintendent, said in the video.

Traffic passes a polling place sign outside a Collin County Early Voting Location at Carpenter Park Recreation Center on Monday, June 29, 2020, in Plano. (Smiley N. Pool/The Dallas Morning News)

The Carpenter Park project also added new security fencing and an additional trail that makes a loop around the entire park. Two new restroom buildings, additional parking, new field lights and poles, and new irrigation were also installed. Other amenities include more trees and a decorative fence along Denham Way.

During construction, the project was temporarily stalled when crews found a red-tailed hawk nest on top of a light pole, according to the city. Crews had to work around the pole until the baby hawks were old enough to fly away.

The expected lifespan of the fields is 7 to 10 years, according to the city.

Other upcoming projects include the installation of two new athletic fields at Russell Creek Park.

Information about reserving an athletic field and policies for their use is available on the city’s athletics page.

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Bohnett Park to Close for Renovation, Storm Water Treatment Project | Local News

October 12, 2020
| 12:10 p.m.

Bohnett Park in Santa Barbara is scheduled to close beginning Thursday, Oct. 15 for construction of a park improvement and storm water treatment project.

The park improvement project, developed with extensive community input, includes the installation of new turf and landscaping, irrigation, picnic tables along Old Mission Creek, barbecue grills, trash and coal receptacles, accessible park entrance and walkways, and new streetscape fencing.

“Bohnett Park is a key recreational area for the Westside,” said Parks and Recreation director Jill Zachary. “We are pleased to be moving forward with a project that will make the park more usable for all.”

The storm water improvement portion of the project includes the installation of underground gravel filled chambers that will capture, treat and infiltrate storm water runoff from the neighborhood surrounding Bohnett Park.

Retaining the storm water on site and allowing it to slowly infiltrate into the ground will help improve water quality in Old Mission Creek.

Civic Construction Associates be doing the construction work, which is expected to take about three months. Work will take place 7 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays. The upper park area along San Andres Street will remain open during construction.

The project is funded by a Community Development Block Grant, the city of Santa Barbara General Fund, and by hotel visitors through Measure B.
 
For more information on park improvements, contact Keven Strasburg, 805-897-1906 or [email protected] For more on the storm water project, contact George Johnson, 805) 897-1958 or [email protected]
 

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