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A muffin tin deep dish pizza recipe for kids

One mom who sees it that way is Ashley Hansen, who was among parents who shared with me tales of cooking with kids.

Hansen, who owns Hansen’s Sno-Bliz snowball stand in New Orleans, admits she is a bit of a Pollyanna when it comes to cooking with her daughter Avery, 8, and son Gordon, 10.

“I always seem to go for this Mary Poppins aspect,” she said. “Let’s make this fun.”

And, snap, the job’s a game – literally.

“We have cooking contests with smoothies, small salads, grilled cheese, cookies. Everyone is encouraged to add a ‘secret ingredient,’” Hansen said, explaining that the idea for the game grew out of family members having their own ideas of how a cookie or smoothie should taste.

“So, I was like, let’s all put in our own special ingredient. They loved the idea of a secret ingredient that would not be revealed until the end.”

Hansen doesn’t leave everything to chance. Some contest ideas are born out of what she finds in her refrigerator or if she over-buys a fruit or vegetable.

“It’s important to lead them. I try to plant seeds and see who picks up what. Look, I have this Tupperware of roasted nuts. Look, I have bananas.”

The family loves crepes. Avery filled one with shredded cheddar and fresh dill. “She won that round,” Hansen said.

Gordon took home the trophy one day with his yogurt smoothie blended with rosemary and blood orange. “Avery and I looked at each other and said, ‘Gordy, this is so good.’”

A salad contest one night ended in another victory for Gordon – and for his mother. The boy made the winning combination of kale and watermelon.

“Ever since then he’s been eating all of his salads,” Hansen said. “He loves salads now.”

“It

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Award-Winning Recipe Blog GiangisKitchen.com Shares 8 Dessert Ideas that Capture the Sweet & Signature Flavors of Fall

Bloomberg

Inside the JPMorgan Trading Desk the U.S. Called a Crime Ring

(Bloomberg) — Billionaires have Davos. For filmmakers, there’s Sundance. For the people who mine and trade and ship everything from iron ore to platinum, there’s London Metal Exchange Week. It’s a blur of symposiums and drinks, with a reliably lavish lunch thrown by JPMorgan Chase & Co. On a balmy October day in 2018, hundreds of guests crossed a courtyard in the shadow of the Bank of England to a medieval guild hall for champagne and sashimi courtesy of the bank and its top metals trader, Mike Nowak.Nowak had plenty to celebrate. His global trading desk at JPMorgan was the powerhouse in futures contracts for gold, silver, platinum and palladium that account for tens of trillions of dollars in transactions annually. In his mid-40s, Nowak had run the precious metals desk for more than a decade. He had a young family, a house outside Manhattan and a seven-bedroom vacation home a few blocks from the beach in New Jersey.But that world was unraveling. Unbeknown to Nowak, one of his former employees was turning on him.That same day, the sun was barely up in Brooklyn when a trader named John Edmonds set off for a meeting with federal prosecutors. Edmonds, who’d worked for years on Nowak’s desk, took a four-hour car trip to Hartford, Connecticut, where he told authorities that Nowak’s crew wasn’t just buying and selling precious metals, but systematically cheating to help themselves and their top clients. Edmonds admitted to fraudulent trades that day in a sealed guilty plea. Soon, others from the precious metals desk provided accounts, setting off events leading to criminal charges against Nowak and four others from the bank.Testimony by Edmonds and others also underpins a U.S. Justice Department criminal investigation into the

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A stuffed portobello recipe only food writer Nigel Slater could design

Overview

Nigel Slater is a food writer’s food writer. The prolific British author’s famously brief recipe introductions read like haikus: “Roasted pumpkin. Smooth, silky mash.” “Autumn mushrooms, ribbons of pasta, a breath of aniseed.” “Crisp pastry. Warm banana. The scent of maple syrup.” They remind me of Ruth Reichl’s much-satirized tweets.

He’s a cook’s cook, too, long advocating a seasonal, breezy approach in the kitchen that has endeared him to readers for decades. In Slater’s hands, few recipes seem daunting — and so many seem enticing.

Slater’s latest book is “Greenfeast: Autumn, Winter,” a celebration of simple vegetarian cooking for colder weather — or, as he writes so beautifully, when “our appetite is pricked by the sudden drop in temperature.” This time of year, “more food will come to the table in deep casseroles and pie dishes,” he writes. “I dig out my capacious ladle for a creamed celery root soup as soft as velvet. The temperature of the plates and bowls will change. We want to hold things that warm our hands, a sign of the happiness to come.”

I’ve stuffed plenty of portobello mushrooms in my time and wasn’t necessarily looking for another such recipe, but Slater’s drew me in anyhow. It’s not complicated: You mash chickpeas into a garlicky, lemony, hummus-esque paste, spread it on two upturned mushroom caps, press in more whole chickpeas (and a sprinkling of black and white sesame seeds) and bake. The puree turns silky, and the mushrooms get pleasantly tender, while staying steak-like enough that you need a knife and fork.

The chickpeas fit neatly inside, making this quite possibly the only stuffed portobello mushroom dish I’ve ever had, let alone made, that I’d classify

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