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After White Hall case, nursing homes remain key in controlling covid

As covid-19 numbers continue to rise throughout Arkansas and Jefferson County, protecting one of the most vulnerable populations has become a priority on the state level. Nursing home residents were hit hard in the state of Arkansas at the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic. The first nursing home case was reported by the Arkansas Department of Health on March 25 and was associated with the Waters of White Hall.

Health officials announced that the initial case at The Waters of White Hall appeared to be associated with a case linked to the original cluster at Jefferson Regional Medical Center.

Since then, the nursing home has had 51 positive residents with the most recent one reported to the health department on Oct. 1. Sixteen residents total were also reported as deceased.

In a previous interview, Donna Morton, the facility’s administrator, released a statement describing The Waters of White Hall’s “aggressive and proactive approach” against the coronavirus through “intense” methods including “monitoring, screening, education and awareness and appropriate prevention and management.”

Efforts to contact Morton on Monday were unsuccessful, but Monday’s report released by the Arkansas Department of Health showed the health care facility has 34 residents who have recovered.

Posts on their social media page pictured residents who had defeated covid-19, calling them the “true heroes.”

On Mar. 13, the Department of Health issued a directive temporarily suspending visitation to nursing homes in Arkansas to reduce the spread of the virus. The directive prohibited all visitation at long-term care facilities unless medically necessary by law enforcement or emergency personnel, a representative from the Department of Health, a representative from the Department of Human Services Office of Long-Term Care or a representative from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

In June the Department of Health allowed the facilities to reopen

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Despite Widespread Pandemic Impacts, Civil Contractors Remain Optimistic

The Civil Quarterly’s recent findings show impacts are manageable, explores emerging strategies to cope

While the vast majority of civil contractors (73%) are experiencing delays with their projects due to the COVID-19 pandemic, contractors are still seeing high levels of backlog and remain relatively optimistic about the state of the civil construction market, according to new data from Dodge Data & Analytics. The second volume of The Civil Quarterly (TCQ) also found delays were reported on approximately one fifth of current projects with little change expected among these contractors over the next six months.

As expected, an overwhelming majority of the contractors surveyed (92%) reported that their business has experienced at least some impacts from COVID-19, but these effects were not uniform. The most frequent impacts identified were increased worker health and safety concerns (44%) and fewer projects starting construction (42%). Notably, while most of the contractors surveyed (76%) have changed work procedures to increase social distancing, and half (50%) have encouraged their office staff to work remotely, only 10% have had to furlough or lay off employees or adjust their salaries in response to the pandemic.

The Civil Quarterly is the result of a partnership with Founding partner Infotech, Platinum partner Hexagon and Gold partners Command Alkon and Digital Construction Works, and is based on original research collected quarterly from civil contractors and engineers. The research provides a snapshot of the current business health of contractors operating in this dynamic environment and explores trends in the industry impacting contractors. This quarter, the study took a deeper look at the impacts of COVID-19 and explored emerging strategies to address the need for social distancing.

The second volume of TCQ also found contractors are still quite optimistic about the state of their industry and their businesses, even though there are some

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Officials preview ideas for choice neighborhood transformation, remind that residents need to remain at the center

Upcoming initiatives in Newport News’ Marshall-Ridley neighborhood transformation efforts may include a seafood market, commercial kitchen and funds to help homeowners spruce up their properties to go along with new apartments and replacement of Ridley Circle apartments.

As officials reviewed building plans and progress, they expressed several times they needed to focus on the residents of the neighborhood.

The City Council held a work session Sept. 15 to discuss the Choice Neighborhood Initiative.

Ricky Burgess, a city councilman in Pittsburgh, advised the Newport News council to remember “(this) process is not primarily about housing — this is about transforming families and helping families so they have a greater chance at success.” Along with housing, Burgess, who helped lead choice neighborhood transformation efforts in Pittsburgh, said new construction there involved community and resource centers, access to transportation and a new charter school.

The council agreed that the focus is not just on transforming the physical community, but the lives of the people there.

“We need total commitment to make this a reality,” Mayor McKinley Price said. He said the city needed to commit through its actions and its budget so that five years from now, they aren’t looking at a new neighborhood with the same issues that have lingered for decades. That would be a waste of time and money, he said.

The Marshall-Ridley Choice Neighborhood encompasses the Ridley Place and Marshall Courts public housing and much of the surrounding neighborhood. The area has higher rates of poverty and unemployment than the rest of the city.

The Newport News Redevelopment and Housing Authority is relocating residents from Ridley Place in preparation of the apartments being torn down and eventually replaced. She said 150 households have vouchers and more than 100 have moved or have new housing in place. The neighborhood has

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