reopened

Highway 29, Silverado Trail Reopened; Firefighters Gain 82 Percent Containment; 642 Homes Destroyed In Napa, Sonoma Counties

ST. HELENA (CBS SF) — Across Wine Country a sense of normality was beginning to take grip early Saturday as major roadways closed by the threat of the Glass Fire were reopened, neighborhoods in St. Helena, Calistoga and Angwin repopulated, less smoke was visible on the horizon and utility crews were busy restoring electrical power to once evacuated homes.

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As of Saturday morning, the Glass Fire burn zone had grown to 67,484 acres with 82 percent containment, but a once promising weather front and the showers it would produce, never arrived.

“Crews experienced minimal fire behavior throughout the night on the Glass Fire,” Cal Fire said in a Saturday morning update. “These conditions consisted of creeping and smoldering fire behavior within the current perimeter.”

There were a few mandatory evacuations still in place, but the majority had been either completely lifted or reduced to warnings that allowed residents to return to their homes.

But for more than 640 families, their return home was not celebratory. Cal Fire damaged assessment teams reported as of Saturday morning, at least 642 homes had been destroyed in Sonoma and Napa counties. Another 157 homes had received some kind of damage.

Among those who lost their home was Mike Christianson and his wife, Mluz Torres. They had watched in horror as the flames engulfed their Napa County home while they were evacuating during the fire’s early hours.

“It was within five minutes, the entire side of the hill was on fire. All trees, all burning, all roaring like a jet,” he said. “And at that moment, we realized that it was time to go. So we grabbed a few things, jumped in the car.”

Others were relieved to find their homes still standing.

“You know, I thought it was going to be a

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Historic mansion on Charleston’s Battery reopened as boutique hotel after renovation | Business

Throughout its history, the mansion at 20 South Battery has been known for its gatherings. Just last month, a historic marker was installed in front of it, naming it as the birthplace of the now 100-year-old Preservation Society

Founder Susan Pringle Frost hosted the organization’s first-ever meeting in the house in 1920. About 50 years before that, Colonel Lathers of the Union Army made the mansion a place where U.S. senators and New Yorkers met with locals.

Now-owner Dr. Jack Schaeffer, a native Charlestonian and part-time Sullivan’s Island resident, hopes the property’s reputation as a host will continue under his guidance. He’s just spent 18 months restoring the 1843 mansion after buying it in 2018. It was reopened as an 11-room boutique hotel on Sept. 10. 



Charleston preservation group closing in on goal for first capital campaign in 100 years

While the coronavirus pandemic has put his plans for utilizing the house’s large ballroom on pause, Schaeffer said a large part of his “philosophy and vision for the house” is to fill it often with special gatherings and charity events.

“I love bringing people together,” he said. 

It would be like “Great Gatsby Charleston-ized,” he said, referencing the literary character’s reputation as a frequent host for fine parties, though his planned functions are much more low-key than Gatsby’s: An annual literary festival, for examples, is planning to host a small number of guests there later this year. 

Formerly called the Battery Carriage House Inn while under the ownership of the Drayton-Hastie family, the property now goes by its address, 20 South Battery. All guest rooms have been redone and outfitted with new amenities, like Smart TVs and redone outlets, and antique beds dated pre-1870, Schaeffer said. 



Inn at reopened Post House in Mount Pleasant overhauled look, added room

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