Replacing

Replacing the Cabinetry in This Kitchen Only Cost $500

You’ll be surprised—and inspired!—by some of the cost-cutting ideas that went into the renovation of this kitchen in a mid-1800s Victorian home located in Kingston, New York. Principal designer Maryline Damour of design and build firm Damour Drake undertook the project from concept to completion with the goal of transforming the space utilizing a careful mix of high/low budget materials. The result offers so many examples of how to use a renovation budget wisely.

AFTER: Maryline achieved her vision of a “rustic, glam, Victorian” kitchen by integrating a mix of high/low materials. Opting to refurbish used cabinets purchased for $500 and construct inexpensive countertops left room in the budget for splurging on the wood-paneled wall treatment, and the eye catching light fixture.

In terms of design, “the goal was an updated Victorian style kitchen,” Maryline explains. She wanted the kitchen to reflect modern aesthetics while referencing the architectural details of the era in which the home was built. In other words, Victorian but make it current.

After gutting the kitchen and reworking the floor plan to be more functional, Maryline sourced used cabinets from Big Reuse, rather than buying all new pieces. Another major save was the quartz countertops dupe constructed with $150 worth of materials from Home Depot. “Everyone thinks they’re Caesarstone,” Maryline says. Instead, they’re made from plywood painted bright white and coated in a thick layer of self-leveling epoxy resin poured on top.

BEFORE: “It was a mess,” Maryline says, of the crowded kitchen layout before, “practically everything had been crammed onto one wall of the kitchen.”

AFTER: The box-pleated sink skirt “is one of my favorite things,” Maryline says. “I was trying to reimagine what people would expect to see in a Victorian kitchen, so I used a very feminine floral fabric but

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Kansas replacing contractor handling Medicaid applications

Kansas is replacing a private contractor that inspired years of complaints about backlogs and other problems in its handling of applications for the state’s Medicaid health coverage for the needy.

The state Department of Health and Environment in August signed a six-year contract worth nearly $135 million with New Jersey-based company Conduent to handle Medicaid applications starting next year, The Kansas City Star reports. Conduent will replace Maximus, based in the Washington, D.C., area.

Former Republican Gov. Sam Brownback’s administration hired Maximus in 2016, hoping to make processing Medicaid applications more efficient and less costly. The company instead received poor marks for its processing and customer-service call center. Democratic Gov. Laura Kelly last year announced plans to hire 300 new state workers to take over the most complicated applications.

Maximus referred calls about the decision to the state health department.

Conduent has had its own troubles, including a lawsuit alleging Medicaid fraud for overbilling dentists in Texas. It was settled last year, and the company said it involved allegations that arose under previous owners.

Conduent operates in all 50 states and 22 countries, according to the bid it submitted to Kansas officials. It supplies Medicaid processing and customer service for 17 states, including Missouri.

Source Article

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Finding the right contractor is key to replacing foundation

Tim Carter
 |  Tribune Content Agency

Ask the Builder

Q: I’m thinking of buying a house that has a crawlspace. The foundation is in very bad shape. Although the house looks quite bad, it’s got good bones. Is it possible to completely remove a bad foundation and install a new, taller one? What’s involved? Who does this type of work? What would you make sure gets done if you’re going to all this work? — Hanna S., Hartford, Conn.

A: Anybody buying such a dilapidated house needs to negotiate a really good deal. The good news is that the old foundation can be removed and replaced with a new cast-concrete foundation, creating a full basement. The task is not much different than eating an elephant. You just take one bite at a time.

Hanna’s question reminded me of a fascinating time early in my building career. Fresh out of college, I had just rehabbed my first house in Cincinnati. It didn’t need a new foundation, but it was otherwise in pretty bad shape. Four months of work transformed the house back to its former glory.

About a half-mile away, a developer wanted to put in a small shopping mall, but there were about 10 houses and an apartment building in the way. Not only did he buy all these properties, but he also proceeded to move them about a mile away on some wooded land he bought at the end of a street. I remember watching these houses, and parts of houses that were cut in half, creeping down the road to their new foundations.

Hanna needs to contact different foundation contractors to see which ones have done exactly what she wants to do. Not all foundation contractors have the expertise to work underneath a house that’s suspended above the

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Ask the Builder: Replacing a foundation can be done, but find the right contractor

Q. I’m thinking of buying a house that has a crawlspace. The foundation is in very bad shape. While the house looks quite bad, it’s got good bones. Is it possible to completely remove a bad foundation and install a new, taller one? What’s involved? Who does this type of work? What would you make sure gets done if you’re going to all this work? – Hanna S., Hartford, Connecticut

A. Anybody buying such a dilapidated house needs to negotiate a really good deal. The good news is that the old foundation can be removed and replaced with a new cast-concrete foundation, creating a full basement. The task is not much different from eating an elephant. You just take one bite at a time.

Hanna’s question reminded me of a fascinating time early in my building career. Fresh out of college, I had just rehabbed my first house in Cincinnati. It didn’t need a new foundation, but it was otherwise in pretty bad shape. Four months of work transformed the house back to its former glory.

About a half-mile away, a developer wanted to put in a small shopping mall, but there were about 10 houses and an apartment building in the way. Not only did he buy all these properties, but he proceeded to move them about a mile away on some wooded land he bought at the end of a street. I remember watching these houses, and parts of houses that were cut in half, creeping down the road to their new foundations.

Hanna needs to contact different foundation contractors to see which ones have done exactly what she wants to do. Not all foundation contractors have the expertise to work underneath a house that’s suspended above the work site, sitting on cribbing made with timbers the size

Continue Reading