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Handyman Helper Is Now Offering Handyman Services To Sioux Falls Residents – Press Release

Handyman Helper Is Now Offering Handyman Services To Sioux Falls Residents

Sioux Falls, SD – Some jobs in your home require the attention of an expert. Whether a person has just purchased furniture that needs assembling or is moving and requires expert attention disassembling the furniture, there is only one company to call in South Dakota – Handyman Helper. Handyman Helper has been helping the members of the community to navigate complex installations, repairs assembly, disassembly, and all other handyman service needs, delivering the best quality services at the most affordable prices.

With help from the team at Handyman Helper, many members of the community have been able to live an accident-free life, especially because the team of highly trained handymen comes to their rescue, handling all of their needs and saving them from the huge cost of medical bills as well as the stress and worry of a DIY installation process.

Describing the commitment to overall customer satisfaction, the spokesperson for the handyman Sioux Falls service company said: “Some say that finding a quality, reliable contractor is a challenge, but not in Sioux Falls! With years of experience helping homeowners and business owners in the Sioux Falls area, we’ve become the go-to handyman and contractor service you can trust. Our enhancement experts have the tools and skills to get the work done right the first time. We’re your South Dakota handyman for installation, repair, and home improvement. With a 100% satisfaction assurance, you can contact us today for complimentary price estimates. Call today to find out more.”

The handyman Sioux Falls understands that service needs are not confined to specific hours during the day and as such guarantees 24-hour availability to address all service needs in and around the community. customers can rest assured that they will be able to enjoy free price estimates for each service to be rendered.

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In war-hit Karabakh capital, residents inspect destroyed homes

Guennadi Avanessian had a big two-storey house at 28 Saroyan Street, with a wooden terrace and vines laden with dark grapes.

But his comfortable middle-class home in a well-off street in the capital of war-hit Nagorno-Karabakh region has been smashed to pieces during the conflict between neighbouring Azerbaijan and Armenia.

“I spent two years renovating this house with my own hands, and (Azerbaijani president) Aliyev destroyed it in two seconds with his bombs,” Avanessian rages to anyone who will listen from behind his moustache.

With a blue hat on his head, the 70-something clambers onto the huge heap of debris that is all that remains after the gutted house collapsed in on itself.

With a shovel, he searches through the twisted sheet metal, bits and pieces of the home’s structure and traces of his former life.

Azerbaijani forces bombarded the area a week ago, and it is the first time Avanessian has returned.

He is looking to scrape together whatever can be salvaged during a lull in the fighting after a ceasefire came into force on Saturday at noon.

“I was here when the rocket came down. I heard a whistle and I rushed into the cellar. I was two seconds away from being killed,” he recalls.

His son-in-law, also in the house that day, got away with an injury — a minor miracle given the total destruction visited on the house.

“It’s a Smerch rocket that did this,” Avanessian says, referring to the Soviet-era “Tornado” projectiles that have been falling throughout Karabakh’s largest city during the past week of fighting over the ethnic Armenian breakaway territory.

“Where will I live now? Under the stars, under the rain? I had everything and now I have nothing left, I can’t find anything. Everything’s blown apart. The only thing I could find

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Wisconsin Residents React to Damage Caused to Homes and Businesses During Chaotic Night In Wauwatosa

WAUWATOSA, Wisc. — A caravan of Black Lives Matter protesters had made it about 6 miles from Milwaukee to Wauwatosa Wednesday evening before being stopped by police in riot gear. Rioters in the crowd began to throw projectiles at the police line, prompting officers to deploy tear gas and pepper balls.

It was a scene that has been played out, too often, in American cities since late May, except this time it was not taking place in the downtown area of a major city. It was happening in residential neighborhoods. The protests were sparked after Wauwatosa officer Joseph Mensah was not charged in a shooting that led to the death of 17-year-old Alvin Cole. Cole was killed on February 2 when he opened fire on officers.

Prior to the confrontation, some in the BLM crowd had smashed windows or threw large rocks through windows of businesses along their path. Businesses damaged included a Kumon tutoring center and a dry cleaners, but rioters did not just target stores.

A small apartment complex was then targeted, with people again throwing rocks through the windows. This time other people in the crowd begged the agitators to stop because that was too far even for them. It only stopped after some ran up to prevent more destruction, but by then the damage was already done.

Jeff, the owner of the apartment complex, was busy at work Thursday morning to clean up the mess and was making the repairs to the building.

He told Townhall four people lived in one of the apartment complexes, but only one person was home at the time it was

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Wisconsin protesters terrorize residents by throwing rocks into homes after shooting decision

Demonstrators wreaked havoc on a suburban Wisconsin neighborhood late Wednesday, smashing the windows of homes, presumably rousing people from their beds, during the civil unrest that unfolded after prosecutors announced they would not charge a Black Wauwatosa police officer for fatally shooting a Black teenager outside a shopping mall in February.

Wauwatosa Police said they deployed tear gas at least twice late Wednesday into early Thursday after crowds failed to disperse in the suburb outside Milwaukee despite officers declaring an unlawful assembly multiple times. The department retweeted a video from Town Hall reporter Julio Rosas showing demonstrators smashing storefronts along Swan Boulevard and W. North Avenue.

WISCONSIN COP SHOULD BE FIRED AFTER 3 SHOOTINGS: PROBE 

Police had urged residents in the area to shelter in their homes, lock their doors and move away from their windows as a crowd of demonstrators swept the area, throwing large rocks at law enforcement.

Another video shared by Rosas and retweeted by the department appeared to show people throwing rocks and smashing the windows of houses during an unlawful assembly. Some in the crowd tried to stop others from targeting residents, and someone is heard shouting: “Hey, that’s somebody’s home!”

Police said they would support the National Guard and Mutual Aid to establish a protective perimeter around Wauwatosa City Hall.

“What started as a protest has become a large disturbance of public order that has caused property damage, and is threatening to cause injury to persons. The Wauwatosa Police has ordered dispersal, and has not obtained compliance,” Wauwatosa Police tweeted. “While not all members of the group intend harm, everyone must disperse immediately. Police are working to disperse this group.”

Wauwatosa Police and Mutual Aid officers also responded to multiple reckless vehicles on main roads in Wauwatosa. There were reports of high rates of

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Residents still face problems with contractors two years after Hurricane Michael

BAY COUNTY, Fla. (WJHG/WECP) – Two years ago Hurricane Michael ravaged our area, and for some, they’re still feeling the effects.



text: We talk with a family living in a trailer after a contractor took their money without repairing their storm damaged home. We are looking at how much money has been stolen from home owners and insurance companies through contractors not doing the job they were hired to do.


© Provided by Dothan WTVY
We talk with a family living in a trailer after a contractor took their money without repairing their storm damaged home. We are looking at how much money has been stolen from home owners and insurance companies through contractors not doing the job they were hired to do.

Residents are still facing problems with fraudulent contractors.

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“Whenever we first moved into the camper it was only supposed to be four months. Here we are almost two years later, same boat,” Bay County resident Kelsie Raffield said.

Raffield’s home has been unlivable for the past two years, but it’s not because of what you see, it’s because of what you don’t.

She said her supposed contractor stole nearly $130,000 of their insurance money.

“The license number was real. He just wasn’t who he said he was,” Raffield said.

Now they’re trying to fix whatever they can on their own.

She looks back at all the signs telling them something wasn’t right.

“Logan did have to tell him like four different times, ‘hey this isn’t right what’s going on?’ You know, those red flags that you notice after you find out things about people,” Raffield said.

However, their case is just one of hundreds filed since Hurricane Michael.

“We’ve had 952 cases assigned to us since November of 2018 in the financial crimes section,” Corporal Dennis Rozier said. “Probably around 70% of those is actually contractor-related or complaints. A number of those are unfounded or they turn into civil; we have had a substantial number of them.”

Bay County Sheriff’s officials in the financial crimes unit say they are still working dozens.

“We’ve had

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