senior

KC Royals’ Kevin Uhlich to retire from senior VP role

Kansas City Royals Senior Vice President of Business Operations Kevin Uhlich will retire from his role overseeing the business side of the organization after 14 seasons in that position.

The Royals announced on Wednesday that Uhlich’s retirement will become official on October 30, and he’ll transition to a position as special assistant to team chairman and CEO John Sherman.

Uhlich, 63, has spent 44 seasons in Major League Baseball, including a stint as a batboy for the California Angels in 1976.

An Anaheim native, he went on to advance in that organization to positions that included VP of stadium operations, VP of sales, marketing and operations and senior VP of business operations in 2002 (the year they won their only World Series championship).

Before he joined the Royals, Uhlich was the executive VP for the Washington Nationals in 2005 and in 2006.

The Royals hired him on November 7, 2006, as senior VP of business operations. During his tenure, Uhlich headed up the $275 million renovation of Kauffman Stadium, completed for the 2009 season, as well as the complete renovation of the Royals spring training facility in Surprise, Arizona, which was completed in February 2016.

Related stories from Kansas City Star

Lynn Worthy covers the Kansas City Royals and Major League Baseball for The Star. A native of the Northeast, he’s covered high school, collegiate and professional sports for The Lowell Sun, Binghamton Press & Sun-Bulletin, Allentown Morning Call and The Salt Lake Tribune. He’s won awards for sports features and sports columns.

Source Article

Continue Reading

Life inside senior care homes, after the coronavirus crucible

In the rooms, halls, and gathering spots of the Commonwealth’s senior care sites, the coronavirus took a particularly insidious hold in the spring and early summer. Rogerson House in Jamaica Plain had the state’s first known senior care fatality. At St. Chretienne Retirement Residence in Marlborough, 22 of 31 nuns contracted the coronavirus. Sickness spread and the residents were isolated from friends and family. Since those dark days, staff members have adjusted even the most basic of routines. Today, the way of life for residents has been transformed.

 Sisters Gloria Cote, 92, (left) and Jeanne Fregeau, 93, shared a laugh on the porch at St. Chretienne Retirement Residence. Both fell ill to COVID-19 during the April outbreak. Cote said, "I wasn't as sick as she was."  Fregeau said, " When I realized what it was I was afraid to die. Then I thought, 'the Lord will come and get me.' I worried about what would happen to Gloria. But I guess it wasn't time because he didn't come get me.''
Sisters Gloria Cote, 92, (left) and Jeanne Fregeau, 93, shared a laugh on the porch at St. Chretienne Retirement Residence. Both fell ill to COVID-19 during the April outbreak. Cote said, “I wasn’t as sick as she was.” Fregeau said, ” When I realized what it was I was afraid to die. Then I thought, ‘the Lord will come and get me.’ I worried about what would happen to Gloria. But I guess it wasn’t time because he didn’t come get me.”Craig F. Walker/Globe Staff
Sisters Fregeau (left) and Cote have been friends for 72 years.
Sisters Fregeau (left) and Cote have been friends for 72 years. Craig F. Walker/Globe Staff
Sister Jeanne D'arc Poirier prepared for lunch at St. Chretienne Retirement Residence.
Sister Jeanne D’arc Poirier prepared for lunch at St. Chretienne Retirement Residence.Craig F. Walker/Globe Staff
Resident George Brackett, 77, had his temperature checked by Stephanie Dupervil, a licensed practical nurse, in his room at Rogerson House in Jamaica Plain. Residents now have their temperature checked twice a day.
Resident George Brackett, 77, had his temperature checked by Stephanie Dupervil, a licensed practical nurse, in his room at Rogerson House in Jamaica Plain. Residents now have their temperature checked twice a day. Craig F. Walker/Globe Staff
Sister Bernadetta Haviland wrote a thank you note in her room at St. Chretienne Retirement Residence. Haviland said she was one of the few residents who did not fall ill during the outbreak. "Thanks be to God. We've just been following the rules, we wash our hands, we stay apart and we wear masks," she said. The residents who were not infected pitched in to help the staff serve meals, wash sheets, and collect trash during the height of the crisis.
Sister Bernadetta Haviland wrote a thank you note in her room at St. Chretienne Retirement Residence. Haviland said she was one of the few residents who did not fall ill during the outbreak. “Thanks be to God. We’ve just been following the rules, we wash our hands, we stay apart and we wear masks,” she said. The
Continue Reading